Answers to Paul's puzzles. Did you get them right?

Driving lessons in Birmingham

Paul’s puzzles answers

Paul’s puzzles answers

Here are the answers to Paul’s puzzles.

I’ve written some detail to explain each one and stop your eye catching just a one-word answer as you scroll down the page.

 

Puzzle 1: Invincible car

The answer is the car’s shadow. It wouldn’t hurt a pedestrian when it hits them and wouldn’t do any damage to a wall. The wind won’t break it and if someone parks a car on top of it you can still move off. It’s free on any car and you can see it but not hear it.

 

Puzzle 2: Energetic examiner

The answer is no he wouldn’t make it back on time. Many people don’t think about questions like this as much as they should and dive straight into doing the math.

If he can run at 8 mph and we divide 8 miles by 60 minutes and he runs approximately 0.13 miles a minute. Take that 0.13 and multiply it by 25 minutes and he runs 3.25 miles. He only had to run 3.2 miles so he made it, right? Wrong.

The question stated that he could reach a top speed of 8 mph, not maintain it. Even the worlds best athletes can’t maintain their top speed for 25 minutes. Maybe for 10 seconds, 30 seconds or even a minute but not 25 minutes. This wasn’t a top athlete: it’s a driving test examiner.

I mentioned his new leather work shoes. Have you ever tried running in NEW leather work shoes? They’re not going to be worn in yet and won’t allow you to run at full speed. He was also carrying a sat nav in a bag and his marking folder, each of which would slow him down.

The examiners work clothes were mentioned in the puzzle. Do you think he’d go running at weekends in his work clothes carrying a sat nav and folder? If his top speed is 8 mph wearing appropriate clothing then he’ll be slower in less appropriate clothing.

I designed this puzzle to get you thinking about these questions in more detail. Well done if you worked it out correctly!

 

Puzzle 3: Catch me if you can

He was doing 95 kph (kilometers per hour) not 95 mph (miles per hour). When converted that’s about 59 mph so he was well under the 70 mph speed limit.

I thought of this when a pupil misread the speedo on a lesson recently. Many drivers never notice the kph reading on their speedo but they are there for if you drive abroad or need them for any reason.

These questions are designed to teach you things so I didn’t mention what the speed limit was. I did say he was driving a small car and it was on a motorway in England so you could easily look it up.

 

Puzzle 4: Street race

Pete was in 2nd. If you pass someone in 2nd place then you become 2nd, not 1st.

 

Puzzle 5: The tired teacher

The driving instructor was walking. Did you assume he was driving?

 

Puzzle 6: A hole lot of trouble

There’s no such thing as half a hole – a hole is always whole!

 

 


     

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